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I feel like I've heard "I'd want to" in very few cases or maybe even not at all. Is this an old settled down preference by the natives or there's a grammatical point that supports it? For example, Is this sentence grammatically all right?

"If there is one thing that I'd want to say about my brother, it's that he's very stubborn."

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    I'd want to know more about why you think this might be wrong before I tried to compose an answer. – J.R. Oct 5 '17 at 19:27
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    @J.R. This is not as simple as it seems, as I'd could be I would or I had. M-J, in this case it's I would: does that make sense to you? – JavaLatte Oct 5 '17 at 20:12
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    Whether would or had has been contracted can be determined from context, since they take different tense verbs. "I'd gone" cannot be would; "I'd want" cannot be had. – Davo Oct 5 '17 at 20:20
  • Guys sorry I didn't mention, yes it's "would". As I've said, I thought it might be wrong because I hardly could remember encountering it. So do you think my example sentence in yellow is okay? – M-J Oct 5 '17 at 20:44
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"I'd want to" is short for "I would want to" and is common usage for most Americans. Perhaps your area doesn't use that particular contraction often and is why you think it is not common.

And yes, your example sentence

"If there is one thing that I'd want to say about my brother, it's that he's very stubborn."

is grammatically correct. Your sentence is saying

"If there is one thing that I would want to say about my brother, it's that he's very stubborn.

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