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We’ll be able to carry any books in New York public library wherever we go, and while resting(while we rest), we’ll be able to read any part from them whenever we want.

Here, 'We'll be able to' is repeated so I guess I can use ellipsis, as in

He likes dancing, and he likes singing, and he likes hiking. >> He likes dancing, singing, and hiking.

But how much, (from where to where) can I take away in this sentence? Should ellipsis part be exactly the same as the part which is being repeated? as in

We’ll be able to carry any books in New York public library wherever we go, and while resting, read any part from them whenever we want

Or can I also leave 'to' or other words in the sentence? as in

We’ll be able to carry any books in New York public library wherever we go, and while resting, to read any part from them whenever we want.

We’ll be able to carry any books in New York public library wherever we go, and while resting, be able to read any part from them whenever we want.

What's confusing me even more is that there's 'and while resting' in the middle of the sentence. It feels like it's interrupting the flow of the sentence so I'm not sure if I can use ellipsis here or not. Should I first reorder the sentence, and then use ellipsis?

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If the verb/predicate takes an infinitival complement, as BE able does (is able to {VERB}), you can include as many such complements as you like, without having to repeat the verb BE able. You also have the option of repeating to or not.

After much practice, the child was able to tie his shoes, comb his hair, button a shirt, and zip up a jacket.

The and in your example is just like the and in my example sentence, "and zip up a jacket", however, the parallel complements are interruped with a while-clause in your example, which "stands outside" the governance of able.

After much practice, the child was able to tie his shoes, comb his hair, button a shirt, and while he could not do it very well, zip up a jacket.

In my example, the while-clause is a so-called concession clause. while can be synonymous with although. You can think of this clause as spoken inside parentheses, as a dramatic "aside":

After much practice, the child was able to tie his shoes, comb his hair, button a shirt, and (although he could not do it very well) zip up a jacket.

In your example, the while-clause is a sort of restrictive condition. You can read only when sitting or at rest, not when walking. It too stands outside the governance of able. It qualifies or restricts the complement.

After much practice, the child was able to tie his shoes, comb his hair, button a shirt, and (while concentrating very hard) zip up a jacket.

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