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Is this some kind of special usage of the verb "make"?

Make him do your homework.

also this one:

The teacher makes the things hardly understandable.

Is there any grammatical logic in these usages of the verb?

2 Answers 2

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It's just the meaning of make.

*X makes Y" means "X do/does something such that the result is X or X is created or completed."

*X make(s) Y Z" similarly means "X do/does something such that the result is Y has created or completed Z."

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    To add on to this, the first phase (Make him do...), make carries a meaning similar to "Force". It generally implies that the individual doesn't want to do a thing voluntarily, but they are being pressured or otherwise given no choice in the matter.
    – moneyt
    Commented Oct 12, 2017 at 1:57
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Make him do your homework

implies the following:

Force him do your homework (if he does not want to do it willingly)


The teacher makes the things hardly understandable

implies:

The teacher has a way of doing / explaining the things hardly understandable

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  • makes things hard to understand. barely understandable.
    – Lambie
    Commented Aug 13, 2020 at 20:18

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