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Which one would you prefer and when?

You can go there sometimes and try out few things.

Sometimes, you can go there and try out few things.

Similarly, I'm having trouble understanding the usage place of 'however'. Almost always (if not always), I see it being used in the middle but in my Math textbooks, I see sentence begun with 'however' many a times.

  • I think both are used interchangeably. It depends on the speaker. – Shaona Bose Oct 13 '17 at 13:24
  • I don't want to migrate this question to English.SE, because I think it has a good chance of being closed if I do. If you'd prefer for your question to be on English.SE anyway, please delete this question and make a new post on English.SE yourself. Make sure you include your research and what you think about the examples, and what you think about the question so far. Otherwise, it's likely to be closed. – snailcar Oct 13 '17 at 13:25
  • @snailplane then, I'll go with you. – ankit Oct 13 '17 at 13:27
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The two examples you provided for "sometimes" are both OK and they mean exactly the same thing.


The case for "however" It would be very useful for you to provide a context of using "However". That way, the answer can be more helpful to you.

Usually I use "however" according to the following pattern:

statement1 however statement2

They can be in the same sentence (with "however" in the middle), or in consecutive sentences (with "however" at the beginning of the second sentence).

The meaning of the construct is: statement1 is correct, but statement2 brings a new point of view which is not entirely compatible with statement1.

Examples:

I like to work; however, I like even more to relax.

or:

Jane is very experienced. However, we cannot hire her because we require a different skill set.

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