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I'm writing an apology letter for missed class. Which of the following should I use?

  • I had not being able to attend the class.
  • I not having been able to attend the class.

If both are ungrammatical, is there any other way to express this?

When I searched for answers, I got more confused. I couldn't find any legitimate solution, and I'm not sure if the sources can be trusted or not. Can anyone help me on this?

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    The first one is ungrammatical, and the second one can only work as a (borderline ungrammatical) dependent clause. – ЯegDwight Dec 15 '13 at 23:01
  • @ЯegDwight Thank you. Is there any other way for expressing the situation. – way2vin Dec 15 '13 at 23:07
  • A native speaker would say "I was not able to attend the class". – ЯegDwight Dec 15 '13 at 23:09
  • Is it okay if I write it in a letter for class teacher or principal.? – way2vin Dec 15 '13 at 23:12
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If you are writing a letter, and you missed a single class, use:

I'm sorry I was not able to attend class.

If you missed a series of classes, and you have not been back to class yet, and you want to allude to the ongoing practice of missing class, use:

I'm sorry I have not been able to attend class.

That second sentence might be better if you were unable to attend class for a more prolonged period of time. It sounds like the wording you might have been fishing for.

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