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He walked on the drain covers and many mosquitoes flied out from the drainage.

"Don't walk on the drain covers. There are many mosquitoes come out."

"Don't walk on the drain covers. There are many mosquitoes coming out."

I told him.

As the context above, should I use present tense or present continues tense?

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  • By the way: simple past of to fly is flew, not *flied.
    – basseur
    Oct 17, 2017 at 10:22

3 Answers 3

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"Come out" is not the idiom I would use. Instead I would say that many mosquitoes live in the drains and will fly out if you go near, or some similar expression like:

Don't walk over the open drain covers. The drains are full of mosquitoes and they will swarm you if you go near.

I use the present tense to indicate the current condition of the drains, but not an ongoing action. I would only use the present continuous to describe something that is actually going on as I speak:

Oh see, look. John didn't listen to my warning and now he's being attacked by the swarms of mosquitoes that live in the drains.

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Mosquitoes can fly up, and out of something but the real annoyance is that they can bite.

Don't walk over the drains otherwise you'll get bitten by the mosquitoes

You can use the simple future (will) for predictions, promises, and warnings.

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Other answers have discussed your choice of words. I will concentrate on the grammar.

It is not a matter of present or present continuous tense: this is not a tensed verb. "There is/are" already contains the main verb, and does not allow another finite verb in the clause.

If there is a verbal construction within it, it must either be an infinitive with "to":

There are many mosquitos to come out.

(which would have the sense that they are supposed, or intended, to come out)

or a participle: the "-ing" form if it is active:

There are many mosquitos coming out.

or the past participle if it is passive:

There are many mosquitos seen.

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