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Context:

  1. I am not able to control myself from laugh.
  2. I am not able to control myself from laughing.
  • Either to control myself or to control my laugh. Idiomatically you can't help doing something or you can't help but to do something. In your case the suitable verb would be to prevent: I was unable to prevent myself from doing something. – Michael Login Oct 17 '17 at 20:49
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    @MvLog - "control my laughing" also sounds reasonably natural to me, as does "keep from laughing". – stangdon Oct 17 '17 at 21:13
  • @stangdon I've learned a rule: if there is a choice between a noun and a gerund—use the noun. Keep from = prevent from (the latter sounds a bit formal, I agree) – Michael Login Oct 17 '17 at 21:21
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    You have not provided "context," you have merely typed two versions of the same sentence. – J.R. Oct 17 '17 at 21:29
1

I would say

I can't control my laughter

or

I can't stop myself (from) laughing

or

I can't stop laughing

"I am not able to" is OK", but "I am unable to" or "I cannot" is probably more natural. However, in ordinary conversation or informal writing we would use "I can't".

Notes:

  • I have assumed that your intended meaning is that you are unable to stop laughing, but "I am unable to control myself from laughing" is acceptable if your intended meaning is "I am laughing so much that I am unable to control myself" - though the latter wording might be clearer.
  • There is a difference of nuance between stopping laughing (which means you have started and then stopped) and stopping yourself from laughing (which suggests preventing yourself from laughing at all).

References:

stop verb (FINISH) [ I or T ] to finish doing something that you were doing: [...] [ + -ing verb ] Stop shouting - you're giving me a headache!

stop verb (PREVENT) [ T ] to prevent someone from doing something: [...] [ + -ing verb ] They've put barriers up to stop people (from) getting through.

control verb [ T ] to order, limit, or rule something, or someone's actions or behaviour

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    to stop myself from laughing is correct too Stop yourself (from) doing something I couldn’t stop myself laughing. She grabbed the rail to stop herself from falling. – Michael Login Oct 17 '17 at 21:26
  • @MvLog Agreed. I've edited my answer. There's a possible difference of nuance. You can laugh a bit but then control your laughter or stop laughing or stop yourself laughing - whereas "stopping yourself from laughing" probably means preventing yourself from laughing (at all / in the first place). In this case, "I can't stop laughing" means that you began to laugh and then tried unsuccessfully to stop, whereas "I can't stop myself from laughing" probably means you couldn't prevent yourself from starting to laugh. "I can't stop myself laughing" could mean either. – rjpond Oct 17 '17 at 21:57

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