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I know this grammar structure. For example:

I have as good a voice as you.

But I'm not sure if you can use a plural noun there. For example:

I have as good books as you.

Or:

They're not as glamorous jobs as people think.

1

To my ear, your examples are marginally grammatical, at best.

It would be more idiomatic to say it this way:

I have books as good as yours.

The jobs are not as glamorous as people think.

They're not as glamorous as people think. strike "jobs"

They're not as glamorous, as jobs go, as people think.

The pattern is as {modifier} as.

Even the first sentence, which a percentage of native speakers would say, strikes other speakers as marginal.

I have as good a voice as you. I have as good a voice as you do. He has as good a voice as her.

I have a voice as good as yours. He has a voice as good as hers.

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