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When pushed, this push switch generates a reaction force opposite (opposing) / against a force applied to it, protecting it from an excessive applied force.

I would like to know which of "opposite / opposing" and "against" is suitable for the sentence above I created. As far as I searched, it seems that "against" is usually used in combination with real objects, such as walls and wind.

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In the sample sentence, both are valid terms. They both express the fact that the reaction force is contra to the force applied.

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I would write:

When pushed, this push switch generates a reaction force opposing the force applied to it, protecting it from an excessive applied force.

A force is more of an abstraction than a physical object. So I would use opposing. And I would use the, since it is specifically the result of the "push" already mentioned.

  • As @Tᴚoɯɐuo mentioned, this phrase could stand some rephrasing (too many words to get the meaning across, and you used "force" three times). – user3169 Oct 21 '17 at 23:11
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The dictionaries present the two words as write similar, without making a distinction.

From my point of view, the difference between them is the active / passive kind of action which they describe:

  • opposite / oppose - is more passive; e.g. a wall is opposing the force applied to it; the wall does not make an effort, it just refuses to comply;
  • against - is a more active active attitude; e.g. people protest against (something); they use energy trying to cancel something they do not agree with.

When we speak about forces, either of opposite / against is (usually) OK, as the reference word (force) already makes clear that use of energy is involved.

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