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I was writing a review on Goodreads and a question emerged after these sentences.

When I was just a wee little boy I would finish this book thinking "Wow. Wonderland Rocks." Today I finished this book with the thought "I miss being a child able to enjoy utter nonsense."

So, where should I place the periods ending the quotations (inside or outside)? Should I use commas before those quotations?

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    There's plenty of style issues round the web. Seek one you like most and keep to it. Oct 24, 2017 at 17:14
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    @SovereignSun - There's more to it than that. (For example, I'd avoid using a US style guide in the UK, especially in matters where they customarily disagree.)
    – J.R.
    Oct 24, 2017 at 17:47
  • The fact it is thoughts has no effect on the usual style rules for placing punctuation around quote marks.
    – James K
    Oct 24, 2017 at 20:38

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As others have pointed out, punctuation style may vary according to dialect.

The most conventional way of punctuating these sentences in American English is as follows.

When I was just a wee little boy, I would finish this book, thinking, "Wow. Wonderland Rocks."

Today I finished this book with the thought, "I miss being a child able to enjoy utter nonsense."

British English follows a slightly different style, and is arguably more sensible:

When I was just a wee little boy, I would finish this book, thinking, 'Wow. Wonderland Rocks'.

Today I finished this book with the thought, 'I miss being a child able to enjoy utter nonsense'.

You'll notice the British style puts periods and commas outside (not inside) of single-quotes (not double-quotes). (Source: http://www.thepunctuationguide.com/british-versus-american-style.html)

Also, notice there are a few more commas in these sentences than you had used, including after thinking and thought.

Finally, notice the comma after book in the first sentence. I added the comma, because without it the sentence technically means the book was thinking. It's a subtle point, but good to know if you want to master written English.

Since these are internal thoughts (called indirect internal dialogue), you can also use italics instead of quotes. I prefer to use this style myself:

When I was just a wee little boy, I would finish this book, thinking, Wow. Wonderland Rocks.

Today I finished this book with the thought, I miss being a child able to enjoy utter nonsense.

Again, the commas are important, as they are in this example:

I miss being a child, he thought, able to enjoy utter nonsense.

(Source: http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/quotation-marks/internal-dialogue-italics-or-quotes/)

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