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Besides "but", "however", "although", what words can be used to mean "in contrast to what was just said" in written English?

For example,

Such analysis is challenging because it is high-dimensional and sparse, however; the result can be more useful and informative.

Can I use "nonetheless", "nevertheless", etc. Any other suggestions? Thanks!w

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    There are tons of expressions to create contrast. Yet, still, whereas, on the other hand, that said, on the contrary, ... But for your quoted sentence I would probably head in the direction of "nonetheless", "despite", "in spite of that", "anyway", "even so" -- something that affirms the first half of the sentence but says the second half balances, mitigates or outweighs it. – Luke Sawczak Oct 28 '17 at 11:44
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"Such analysis is challenging because it is high-dimensional and sparse**:** however; the result can be more useful and informative."

I do agree with Luke that one of the options he mentions is probably the appropriate one to use.

In addition to those you mentioned, the Oxford Dictionary gives us:

nevertheless, nonetheless, still, yet, though, even so, for all that, but for all that, despite that, but despite that, in spite of that, but in spite of that anyway, anyhow, be that as it may, having said that, notwithstanding

Merriam-Webster yields:

even so, howbeit, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, still, still and all, though, withal, yet

Words related to however

after all, anyhow, regardless

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