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I have this sentence:

We repeated the same process for the next car, but using the product B, and recorded the data accordingly.

I am not sure if the italicized part is grammatically correct. But if so, I think it is due to coordinate deletion (but [we repeated the same process] using the product B) or being a participle phrase. Which one is it?

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    Is there a reason you need to know the exact part of speech? Most native speakers don't even know or care what is a "participle phrase" much less the more obscure "coordinate deletion". – Andrew Oct 28 '17 at 20:11
  • "but using product B" or "but using the product Zoatribublan". The definite article is used when product is given a name, but not when it is given merely a label. The label does the work of the article. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 1 '17 at 1:34
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Indeed, the implication here is that we are saying this: 'We repeated the same process for the next car, but [we repeated the process for the next car] using product B, and recorded the data accordingly.'

I agree with Tᴚoɯɐuo— here we need 'product B', not 'the product B'.

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I think it is because it is a participle phrase. You could, after all, legitimately reverse the order: "Using product B, we repeated the same process for the next car." You'd be more likely to call it a participle phrase, then. But I think you could argue that there is a form of coordinate deletion going on in all participle phrases, which is what can lead to dangling participles.

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The participle phrase is used when expressing an attendant circumstance, a circumstance that obtains during the action of the main clause.

The phrase can be introduced by but to indicate a change in attendant circumstance—a departure of some kind from a prior circumstance.

Last week the roof leaked and we had water on the ceiling near the chimney. This week we had more rain and another leak, but coming in through the gable window.

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