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The student was trying to structure an interrupter. I am looking for a grammatical explanation to help her understand the error between the conjunction and the preposition. Beyond just explaining the meaning of each term ('even though' and 'with'), isn't the subject also needed before the interrupter begins?

On the other hand, big cities are excellent places for people who like diversity. These cities have a population of millions of people. People around the world come to big cities to find better job opportunities, or because they are looking for places with lots of fun. Even though, with many people going from one place to another, traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities. Unlike from small towns, the social environment is more diverse.

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"Even though" in this case functionally serves as a conjunction. The problem here to me seems not that the interruption clause is misconstructed, but rather, as you said, that the first part of the sentence has no subject.

I'd first tell her to remove the interrupter from the sentence and analyze if THAT makes sense.

Even though traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities.

This is pretty clearly missing something. Maybe the subject is referred to in the previous sentence? Starting a sentence with a conjunction can be tricky, so maybe just relocate the meaning into this sentence and then add the interrupter.

Big cities nowadays, with many people going from one place to another, will always suffer from traffic on the streets.

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It looks like this sentence was intended to contradict or modify what was said in the preceding sentence. I believe what was meant could be-

Even though we accept this, with many people...etc.

In my example usage the word 'this' implies what was said in the preceding sentence. A conjunction joins two sentences. 'Even though' by itself does not carry any implication of a join to another idea.

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The concession clause, which cannot stand on its own as an independent clause, is:

even though traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities

This adds extra info and would be an adjunct:

with many people going from one place to another

The adjunct could follow even though or it could follow big cities:

even though, with many people going from one place to another, traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities

even though traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities, with many people going from one place to another

At this point we still have only the fragment of a sentence; it lacks an independent clause.

Even though traffic on the streets will always be a problem in the big cities, with many people going from one place to another, many city-dwellers still purchase automobiles and rarely take public transportation.

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