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They overturned the great waist-high earthenware jugs; duck eggs, pickled fruits, vegetables burst out and mixed in acrid torrents"

From no name woman, Maxine Hong Kingston.

  1. I know the semicolon is put between two complete sentences which are joined because they're both about an idea, but can stand alone as well. So "duck eggs, pickled fruits, vegetables burst out and mixed in acrid torrents" is a complete sentence.
  2. What i confuse is: can duck eggs, pickled fruit... mix themselves? or should this be passive voice?
  3. And can someone explain me "acrid torrents"?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Oct 31 '17 at 1:18

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Mix is used here in its intransitive sense. There's no object. The subject generally comprises two or more substances, and there's an implied "(with each other)." Another example of that sense is "oil and water do not mix."

(As to acrid torrents, that's a different question and should be posted separately, but there's no special meaning beyond the dictionary definitions of those words.)

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