0

Is it appropriate to use a colon to introduce a title of a book/publication/etc in the middle of a sentence? For instance, consider the following example

My hard work resulted in a book: "X" with co-authors A, B, and C.

The other way I can think of is to say

My hard work resulted in "X" with co-authors A, B, and C.

However, the reason I am hesitant of saying it the latter way is because it matters whether it is a "book" or a "publication." Hence, I need to clarify and I'm not sure how to introduce both the name of the work and the type of work it is in a smooth manner.

4

You can use commas.

My hard work resulted in a book, A Brief History of Time, with co-author Stephen Hawking.

This is an apposition. It would work well as a bullet point.

You could also use a verb to give a little relative clause.

My hard work resulted in a book titled A Brief History of Time, with co-author Stephen Hawking.

This could be better as part of paragraph.

In typeset work, book titles are put in italics

  • If I'm writing something official such as academic document, which version is the more appropriate one? And also, what does typeset refer to? – Jonathan Oct 31 '17 at 10:50
  • typeset, means not handwritten. Produced on a system that has the abiltiy to change font. I would use commas if I wanted brevity, and "titled" if it was part of longer more flowing paragraph. – James K Oct 31 '17 at 11:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.