0

Is it appropriate to use a colon to introduce a title of a book/publication/etc in the middle of a sentence? For instance, consider the following example

My hard work resulted in a book: "X" with co-authors A, B, and C.

The other way I can think of is to say

My hard work resulted in "X" with co-authors A, B, and C.

However, the reason I am hesitant of saying it the latter way is because it matters whether it is a "book" or a "publication." Hence, I need to clarify and I'm not sure how to introduce both the name of the work and the type of work it is in a smooth manner.

4

You can use commas.

My hard work resulted in a book, A Brief History of Time, with co-author Stephen Hawking.

This is an apposition. It would work well as a bullet point.

You could also use a verb to give a little relative clause.

My hard work resulted in a book titled A Brief History of Time, with co-author Stephen Hawking.

This could be better as part of paragraph.

In typeset work, book titles are put in italics

2
  • If I'm writing something official such as academic document, which version is the more appropriate one? And also, what does typeset refer to?
    – Jonathan
    Oct 31 '17 at 10:50
  • typeset, means not handwritten. Produced on a system that has the abiltiy to change font. I would use commas if I wanted brevity, and "titled" if it was part of longer more flowing paragraph.
    – James K
    Oct 31 '17 at 11:02

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .