1

"on one hand,..., on the other hand" can be used to describe two aspects of something. But I am wondering if there is other structure can be used for this purpose. For example,

On one hand, the backgrounds need not be re-computed when new data arrives, rather, they are updated with much less computational cost; on the other hand, it helps capture the potential unusual in a timely manner, and ask the doctors, drug laboratories or insurance companies to pay prompt attention.

The structures I can think of include "not only, ..., but also", for example,

This is not only because the backgrounds need not be re-computed when new data arrives, but aslo it helps capture the potential unusual in a timely manner, and ask the doctors, drug laboratories or insurance companies to pay prompt attention.

Are there any other structures can be used for the same purpose of describing two aspects of one thing? Thanks!

  • The simplest structure in English to carry the sense of On one hand [statement #1], on the other hand [statement #2] is simply [statement #1], but [statement #2]. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 31 '17 at 17:16
  • I usually found "on the one hand,…, on the other hand" (AmE). – user3169 Oct 31 '17 at 18:26
2

There are many ways to express alternatives. Here is one:

For one thing, the backgrounds need not be re-computed when new data arrives, rather, they are updated with much less computational cost; nevertheless, it helps capture the potential unusual in a timely manner, and ask the doctors, drug laboratories or insurance companies to pay prompt attention.

Note that you have a comma splice in your first clause. Here's one way to fix that (there are, of course, others):

For one thing, the backgrounds need not be re-computed when new data arrives, and they are updated with much less computational cost; nevertheless, it helps capture the potential unusual in a timely manner, and ask the doctors, drug laboratories or insurance companies to pay prompt attention.

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2

However can work in such cases:

When we do not do X, the background does not need to be recomputed, resulting in lower computational cost; however, anomalies may not be detected in a timely manner.

So can although

When we do not do X, although the background does not need to be recomputed, resulting in lower computational cost, anomalies may not be detected in a timely manner.

So can but (as FumbleFingers mentions in his comment):

When we do not do X, the background does not need to be recomputed, resulting in lower computational cost, but anomalies may not be detected in a timely manner.

So can while (which can be combined with contrasting verbs):

Not doing X, reduces computational costs since the background does not need to be recomputed, while it increases the chances that anomalies may not be promptly detected.

Not doing X, while reducing computational costs since the background does not need to be recomputed, increases the chances that anomalies may not be promptly detected.

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0

"By all means, however:" Maintains circumstantial laws and invites a new perspective. Also weights the scale in favour of the presented notion.

On one hand or the other refers to two balanced counterparts even tho each individual favours one over the other (left/right) meaning you can present two notions yet attempt to maintain neutrality.

Not to play the devil's advocate but: Maintains neutrality but defines the options

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