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enter image description here

Picture is from web.

One person leans back and dips down to dodge the swing of a sword. What is this move called? I think I heard a movie description say "he ends back", or "he hens back," or "hangs back." None makes sense to me. What could the verb be?

  • Maybe "he leans back"? – SovereignSun Nov 1 '17 at 5:59
  • He bends back? – J.R. Nov 1 '17 at 8:31
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Well, I'm not sure if there is verb that describes this movement, but I did dig up something, that might be useful to you:

Sword Limbo: A common maneuver in a Sword Fight: one character will dodge a sword swipe by bending over backward as the opponent's blade whips horizontally over their body.

enter image description here

I even found the exact image you attached in the question, where I found this term. I'm not sure whether this is an officially valid term, but it seems to fit your description.

This must've been derived from Limbo, a traditional popular dance contest that was known to be originated on the island of Trinidad.

enter image description here

In this dance, a horizontal bar, known as the limbo bar, is placed atop two vertical bars. All contestants must attempt to go under the bar with their backs facing toward the floor. Whoever knocks the bar off or falls is eliminated from the contest. When passing under the bar, players must bend backwards. No part of their bodies is allowed to touch the bar and no part other than their feet may touch the ground. After everyone has completed their turns, the bar is lowered slightly and the contest continues. The contest ends when only one person can successfully "limbo" under the bar without penalty.

Besides this, you could just say:

He dodged the sword swing, by bending/ leaning backwards.

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You can say "dodge the sword by bending over backward" like Neo did when he was dodging bullets in The Matrix.

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