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The enmity between the (A) / two groups had reached a level (B) / where reconciliation has (C) / become impossible.(D)

The key which I have suggests to change has to had, but I think has is correct here, as using had in place of has will change the meaning of the sentence.

Instead, I think it's better to use reconciliation between them (or something like that) to correct this sentence. Am I correct?

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    Stay focused on the verbs. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 3 '17 at 18:26
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The problem is with the sequence of tenses in the two clauses. In one clause you are using the past perfect and in the other the present perfect. You can see the problem if you switch out of the perfect in the second clause.

"The enmity ... had reached a level where reconciliation becomes impossible" mixes up a statement about an event that preceded an event in the past with a statement that pertains only to the present. It makes no sense.

Any of the following are fine.

"The enmity had reached a level where reconciliation had become ..." put both ideas into a past that precedes some other past event, perhaps a divorce. Both clauses in the past perfect.

"The enmity ... reached a level where reconciliation became ..." indicates past events. Both clauses in the simple past.

"The enmity ... has reached a level where reconciliation has become ..." indicates a continuation into the present of a situation that started in the past.

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