1

Her father opposed to her marrying a foreigner

In the above sentence it's used a gerund 'marrying' after the pronoun 'her'. What if I use a infinitive verb instead of using a 'gerund' as;

Her father opposed to her to marry a foreigner

Is there any exceptions not to use infinitives after pronouns in such sentences or are these sentences having different meaning?

  • Neither is correct. The problem is the preposition "to". But you can say or "Her father opposed her marrying a foreigner", or with an object, "Her father opposed her marriage to a foreigner". – BillJ Nov 4 '17 at 19:59
  • Also (if it helps) "Are there any exceptions to using infinitives...". – Francis Davey Feb 23 '18 at 23:28
3

Her father opposed her marrying a foreigner. ✓

Source: Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Some verbs are followed by a gerund, some with a to-infinitive, and some with either. The best way to make sure which to use is check in a good dictionary.

  • I have a question with the sentence "The best way to make sure which to use is check in a good dictionary." Why don't you put "...which to use is to check in a good dictionary" – dan Nov 4 '17 at 23:10
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    @dan: Both are correct. If fact there's an implicit "to" before "check", e.g. All you need to do is (to) sleep more = To sleep more is all you need to do. – Mori Nov 5 '17 at 6:12

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