4

I know that both "more" and "else" can be used in the meaning of "besides". Well, at least I think so. Here are examples:

  1. I have told you all I know. What else do you want with me?
  2. I have told you all I know. What more do you want with me?

As far as I am aware, the later is less common but carries the same meaning as the former sentence.

For this not to sound like a duplicate, here's the main question: Can "else" and "more' work in an identical way in the following sentences with the words "anything, something, whatever, whenever, wherever, whomever, whoever, someone, somebody, and everything"?

  • I've already helped your mom and sister. Is there anyone more you want me to help?
  • That's it. I can't help him. There's nothing more I can do!

Edit: It's not a duplicate. I'm not asking about the difference between "what else" and "what more". I'm asking about using "else" and "more" with words "anything, something, whatever, whenever, wherever, whomever, whoever, someone, somebody, and everything".

  • 2
    want from me – Mv Log Nov 5 '17 at 0:24
  • 1
    @MvLog - "What do you want from/of/with me?" - all these prepositions are possible. See here – Rompey Nov 5 '17 at 22:17
  • 1
    @Rompey In the examples provided from is the most probable case. With just sounds archaic; we can see that on the graph you've linked. – Mv Log Nov 6 '17 at 1:51
  • I guess there's not a person here who knows how this works so he can tell me, right? – SovereignSun Nov 13 '17 at 16:05
  • It's not a duplicate, reread the question attentively. – SovereignSun Nov 15 '17 at 4:22
1

For the first couple of sentences, refer to the suggested other question...

Referring to the rest of the questions:

In the first case, "more" is incorrect (although it would be understood). Your mom and sister are different entities.

I've already helped your mom and sister. Is there anyone more else you want me to help?

But it could be used in a slightly different phrasing, if the family is thought of as group of people:

Do you have more family members you want me to help?


In the second case, "more" is correct, suggesting that you did some things to help but you can't do more things (nothing more).

That's it. I can't help him. There's nothing more I can do.

In this case "else" would be correct if specific actions were listed:

I gave him a map, showed him the place and suggested a path. There's nothing else I can do.

But "more" would also be correct, as it suggests "more help".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.