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In sentences like:

  • I get to see my father very often.

or

  • I don't get to go to the park.

what does the phrase "to get to [verb]" mean? Does it mean that I am allowed to do something (see my father) or not allowed to do something (go to the park)? Or does it mean that it is respectively possible and not possible for me to do these things? Am I wrong in my assumptions and meaning is based on context? Are the affirmative and negative forms entirely different?

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    Did you consult a dictionary before asking your question? Oxford Living Dictionaries has definition 3.4 of get: "Have the opportunity to do" and an example very similar to yours. – The Photon Nov 5 '17 at 17:02
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There are numerous meanings of "to get to." The one you are using means to have the ability to do something that you want to do. So, if you say I get to see my father very often it has the meaning that not only are you able to see your father, but it's something that you want to do. If you don't get to go to the park, you're disappointed about it.

Other meanings:

  1. Don't let it get to you. (Don't let it annoy you.)
  2. I'll get to my homework after I finish dinner. (I will start doing my homework after I finish dinner.)
  3. I can get to your house by five o'clock. (I will be able to arrive at your house by five o'clock.)
  4. You'll get to like exercise before too long. (You will start to like exercise before much time has elapsed.)
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I get to see my father very often.

I don't get to go to the park.

The first sentence means that you have/you are given the chance to see yiur father very often.

The second sentence means that you don't have/you are not given the chance to go to the park.

The verb get in the form "get + to infinitive" means to have the chance/be given the chance to do something (Merrian Webster).

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