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Attribute as a verb what does it mean? Give an example. As a noun it is similar to skill / characteristic

Thanks in advance.

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    Did you look in the dictionaries? What is it said there? – SovereignSun Nov 8 '17 at 3:47
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    Yes i looked there: to say that a situation or event caused by something/ someone – AmerYR Nov 8 '17 at 3:50
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Well, here's the definition from Oxford's dictionary:

  1. attribute something to something - to say or believe that something is the result of a particular thing:

    • She attributes her success to hard work and a little luck.

This means that "hard work and a little luck were the result of her success."

  1. To say or believe that somebody is responsible for something, especially for saying, writing or painting something:

    • attribute something - The committee refused to attribute blame without further information.

This means that "the comittee refused to ascribe blame".

  • attribute something to somebody - This play is usually attributed to Shakespear.

This means that "Shakespear is believed to be responsible for writing this play"

Another explanation by Oxford's living dictionary:

  1. to attribute something to - regard something as being caused by something.

    • "his resignation was attributed to stress" - stress was the cause of his resignation.
  2. to attribute something to someone - to ascribe a work or remark to (a particular author, artist, or speaker)

    • "the building was attributed to Inigo Jones" - the building is ascribed to be the work of Inigo Jones.
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    Oxford dictionary explain better than long man dictionary which I had. Thanks, sometimes even if i look in the dictionary I did not get the full meaning and where to put the word in a sentence. – AmerYR Nov 8 '17 at 4:07
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    @Ameryr In the future I advise you to search definitions in Oxford, Merriam-webster, Cambridge, and Collins. I'm not saying that Longman dictionary is worse but I prefer those I've listed. – SovereignSun Nov 8 '17 at 4:23

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