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When you cook something (Let's say "seafood pasta") by following a recipe, do you say "I am cooking seafood pasta from a recipe"? i.e., Do you say "cook ... from a recipe"? Or do you say "cook ... after a recipe? Or else?

  • One question at a time, please. Ask your question about "recipe" separately. – Nathan Tuggy Nov 8 '17 at 6:13
  • Dear Nathan, thank you for your advise! Then, I would like to ask about the second one: about a sentence. – user64707 Nov 8 '17 at 6:31
  • You can edit to focus on whichever of the two questions you want, then ask the other one separately. – Nathan Tuggy Nov 8 '17 at 6:40
  • Dear Nathan, Thank you again! I didn't know this. – user64707 Nov 8 '17 at 6:50
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Yes, saying that we cook or make something from a recipe is perfectly idiomatic. There are numerous examples extant:

She's been making stuffed peppers for years from a recipe off of a veggie crumbles package.

...individual Yorkshire puddings made from a recipe I found...

I still bake cookies from a recipe card in the handwriting of my mother...

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  • Thank you very much for your answer! I can now be confident using a sentence with "from". I really appreciate your help. Thank you! – user64707 Nov 9 '17 at 0:46
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You usually "follow a recipe"

  • Baking a cake isn't difficult - it's just a matter of following the recipe.
  • I never follow recipes exactly when I cook - I just use them as rough guides.

However, you can also "cook a recipe":

  • Yesterday, I cooked the "Chicken doused in fresh coconut paste" recipe and it was incredibly tasty.
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  • Thank you very much for your answer! I really appreciate your help. Thank you! – user64707 Nov 9 '17 at 0:43

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