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The following is from 'The Blackhouse' by Peter May

He just stood staring at Fin, deep shadows cut in stony features by the light on Fin's desk.

I don't understand the bold description. Can you explain it, please?

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The phrase isn't idiomatic. It's probably metaphor.

It seems to be intended to evoke imagery, both of the unchangeability ("stoniness") of the person's affect and the contrast of light and shadow cast by the singular desk lamp. The shadows are "cut" like something carved or etched into a rock surface. Stony features may also hint that there are ridges and wrinkles on the man's face, or that he has a fixed expression that is wrinkling and furrowing his facial features.

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It's an elliptical absolute clause (and includes the prepositional phrase by the light on Fin's desk), characterizing the entire independent clause, "He just stood staring at Fin".

He stood staring at Fin, deep shadows cut in (his) stony features by the light on Fin's desk.

The ellipsis of "his" is a rhetorical device; this is not a typical conversational remark. The ellipsis of the pronoun presents a bare stony visage, unconnected to the person to whom it belongs.

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