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The tank is charged with 10 liters of gas.

I am trying to rewrite the sentence above such that gas is the subject. My example is as follows:

  • 10 liters of gas is charged in/to the tank.
  • The amount of gas charged in/to the tank is 10 liters.

Could anyone advise me on whether the usage "charged in/to" is correct?

  • What type of 'tank' are you referring to. A car's gas tank? A propane tank? Sherman tank? Different tanks may use different verbs. – EllieK Nov 8 '17 at 13:47
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    The original sentence, "The tank is charged with...", sounds sounds kind of non-fluent to this US English speaker; charged only seems to be used in technical writing. In everyday speech we would normally say the tank is filled with gas. – stangdon Nov 8 '17 at 13:53
  • I think "gas (or other material such as water) is filled in the tank" is grammatically incorrect. I want to know whether "gas is charged in the tank" is grammatically correct or incorrect. – rama9 Nov 8 '17 at 14:31
  • You need to specify what the gas (gas or liquid such as gasoline) is and what the tank (container) is. For example, when you add freon to a refrigeration system, you charge the system. I imagine the difference might be volume vs. pressure. – user3169 Nov 8 '17 at 18:09
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"Charged" is used for electrical storage, like batteries. A gasoline (or petrol, in BrE) tank would be "filled".

I filled the gas tank with fifteen gallons.

I charged my cell phone overnight so now it's at 100 percent.

Similarly, you will fill (or fill up) any other container:

We filled our water bottles before we went on the long hike.

They filled up their suitcases with souvenirs from the countries they visited.

As with almost anything in English, this can be metaphorical:

The bad English teacher filled his students' heads with antiquated grammar rules.

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