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What is the difference between ""Making friends with English."" and ""Making friends in English.""?

I want to say "use English to make friends",which one is better?

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    What difference between "with" and "in" have you found?
    – Davo
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:25
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    In my brain, ""with"" means ""use"" or " do things together with somebody "
    – Gary
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:31
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    "in" means in some circumstance ,or inside something . sorry,I am not really good at English ,maybe it's hard to get what I mean.
    – Gary
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:33
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    The answer below was not visible when your question came before me. That answer and comment are clear, and should guide you.
    – Davo
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:36
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    Thank you . Maybe the problem is that I don't really know how to use "with " and " in " as a precise way.
    – Gary
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:44

1 Answer 1

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"Making friends with English" means that you use English as a means to make friends (the reason you made those friends is that you spoke English). "Making friends in English" means that you made a friend, and you spoke English to do so. "Using English to make friends" is a more elegant ("better") way to say "Making friends with English". The third option is probably the best.

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    "Making friends with English" could also be interpreted as "Making the English language into your friend". I agree that your third option is the clearest of all.
    – stangdon
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:26
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    That is the first time I know this kind of using , It's good learning to me. Is it mean instil English into the head of friends?Just like brain washing?
    – Gary
    Nov 10, 2017 at 12:48
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    To Daniel G , I appreciate your help ,very helpful. and as your advice and knowledge ,I will use "using" directly to describe situation like that . . But I still have a little bit of confusion.Could you help me with making some sentences besides making friends to show the difference between in and with ?
    – Gary
    Nov 10, 2017 at 13:03
  • @Gary It's not an impossible interpretation, but one usually doesn't think of the phrase "to make friends" as such a unilateral action.
    – chepner
    Nov 10, 2017 at 15:13
  • I'll help you, Gary: "He is in the room with me." "In" means inside the room; "with me" means we are together in the room.
    – Nick
    Nov 25, 2017 at 6:50

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