1

Is the phrase push or pull through, interchangeable regarding the words push and pull? Is one word more grammatically correct than the other?

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Depends on the statement you are emphasizing on, 'push through' and 'pull through' are both phrasal verbs.

Note: A phrasal verb is a phrase consisting of a verb and either or both of a preposition or adverb that has idiomatic meaning. Such as your examples 'pull through' and 'push through'; 'push' is a verb and 'through' could be adverb or preposition. It depends on the statement.

The president is trying to push through various tax reforms.

Meaning: "to cause a plan or suggestion to be officially accepted or put into use"

I'm glad he pulled through.

Meaning: "To survive something"

1

There is no grammatical difference between them, but they have different meanings.

When used literally, pushing is applying force from behind to press something through a gap; pulling is applying force from the front to draw it through.

If you're using them figuratively, it is possible that they will both do in some context: it depends on the context.

As idioms, they have specific meanings that are not interchangeable: "push something through" means to work to get it accepted or approved, or voted on. "Pull through" (intransitive) means to survive an illness or injury.

0

Depends on the statement you are emphasizing on, 'push through' and 'pull through are both a phrasal verb' Note: A phrase consisting of a verb and either or both of a preposition or adverb, that has idiomatic meaning. In your examples pull through and push through, push is a verb and through could be adverb or preposition. It depends on the statement.

e.g: The president is trying to push through various tax reforms.

Meaning: "To cause a plan or suggestion to be officially accepted or put into use:"

e.g: I'm glad he pulled through.

Meaning:

"To survive something".

You can check for more clarifications at these links:

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