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Which of this is right?

I am part of the swimming team at my school or
I am part of the swimming team of my school

Thank you in advance!

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They are both correct but have slightly different meanings.

"I am part of the swimming team of my school" means I am a member of the swim team that belongs to my school. So if your school has a swim team, but it doesn't have a pool, so they meet somewhere else, you could say, "I am part of the swim[ming] team of my school."

"I am part of the swimming team at my school" means I am a member of the swim team that is located at my school. So if your school has a swim team that is located on campus but administered by some outside organization, you could say, "I am part of the swim[ming] team at my school."

In most cases, a swimming team belonging to a school will also be located at a school - in these instances the meaning is equivalent.

3

In idiomatic American English:

I'm on the swim team at my school.

"I am part of" sounds fine in a formal or written context, but "swimming team" sounds quite unnatural to me. You could also say:

I'm on my school's swim team.

"swim team of my school" sounds like an unnecessary unwinding of the possessive.

5
  • Can I say I'm in the swim team at my school. “I‘m on the swim team" sounds like "I stand on a swim team" to me. :) Just curious.. thanks. – McMillan Cheng Nov 18 '17 at 3:13
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    No. In English we always say “on the team.” It’s like serving on a committee. You can be a member of the team, too. – mamster Nov 18 '17 at 4:02
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    I just did a little research on this. It seems 'in the swim team' is fine in BrE. – dan Nov 18 '17 at 5:55
  • @dan Sounds like a good news to a non-native English speaker like me. thanks for your update. – McMillan Cheng Nov 18 '17 at 6:43
  • @mamster thanks for your comments, it is helpful for me. I also found this:search on this site, maybe different culture in UK. :D – McMillan Cheng Nov 18 '17 at 15:23

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