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The sentence is this,

I knew that from January until April my father had gone to eight different doctors.

I am confused. In my opinion, "from January to April" would be more appropriate to use here. Can anyone here please tell me the rule related to this?

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    Both are fine in Modern English. Also "till" could be used instead of "until" or "to".
    – Nick
    Commented Nov 19, 2017 at 8:14
  • @NicholasCastagnola so "to, until, till" all could be used here and sentence will remain grammatically correct? Alright, thank you :) Commented Nov 20, 2017 at 10:38
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    In this situation, yes, they are all fine. That's not always the case that "until" and "to" can be used in the same spot, but here it can be. "till" and "until" are always interchangeable, however, but this is a situation in which "to" is also allowed. See definition 13b. Up till; until: worked from nine to five. thefreedictionary.com/to
    – Nick
    Commented Nov 20, 2017 at 13:18
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    I would be more inclined to say "between January and April". Use of "until" makes me feel that April was a more final end. Commented Nov 22, 2017 at 2:06

1 Answer 1

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I knew that from January to April my father had gone to eight different doctors.

Your father might still have been going to doctors after April.

I knew that from January until April my father had gone to eight different doctors.

You're implying that your father stopped seeing doctors after he saw the last one in April.

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