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https://www.lingq.com/lesson/lesson-19-taking-risks-431414/

Hey, you know I didn't get to be where I am today without taking some risks.

What does "get to be" mean in the above context? I guess it means "reach", but I am not sure. and I need some simple examples in plain English of using "get to be".

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    I agree to your opinion. In the context 'get to be' means 'reach'. (I'm not a native speaker.) – Floret Nov 19 '17 at 17:00
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Hey, you know I didn't get to be where I am today without taking some risks.

= same as =

Hey, you know I didn't acquire the position that I am in today without taking some risks.

...implying that the speaker is in a "high position" with the company they work for, and possibly implies that they earn lots of money.


After thinking more about it,

"I get to" implies a good, positive thing that is going to happen to me (either now or in the future).

It is the opposite of "I have to" which implies I am not happy about something that I need to do (either now or in the future).

I get to fly an airplane tomorrow! :-)

I get to go home and see my children now! :-)

...as opposed to:

I have to go to the dentist tomorrow. :-(

I have to go home and see my children now. :-(

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    dear ashleedawg: thanks for your answer. but I don't know the strange phrase in your answer, I mean "I are not" is a mistake or not. If it is not a mistake would you please inform me about that. – AR AM Nov 19 '17 at 18:35
  • @AR-AM -- You are correct; that was a mistake. Good Job! You're ready to start teaching English! :-) ...the words "I are" should never be next to each other. – ashleedawg Nov 19 '17 at 18:58

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