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Are there differences in meaning (and possibly context) of the following three ways to ask somebody to wait? Or is one of these options even ungrammatical?

1 I'm going to ...

I'm just going to make a quick phone call.
Can you wait for me?

2 I'm doing

I'm just making a quick phone call.
Can you wait for me?

3 I'll do

I'll just make a quick phone call.
Can you wait for me?

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  • I would say "I have to make a quick phone call." This politely indicates the necessity, since you are inconveniencing the other party.
    – user3169
    Nov 20, 2017 at 0:32

1 Answer 1

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They all mean exactly the pretty much the same thing, although technically #1 and #3 could imply that the phone call hasn't started yet (but is about to), and #2, **making* implies that you have already started the call (perhaps just started dialing).

The are all grammatically correct, and sound fine, although if it was me, I would probably would say:

Would you mind waiting for me while I make a quick phone call?

Pretty much the same too.

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