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Her hair was not too long or too short, her face (was) not too round or too angular, her body (was) not too thin or too thick.

I think you can omit "was" in certains lists. But I'm not sure if that's allowed in the example above.

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    I don't know if there is a rule, but I've seen this used, usually in novels. I think it is done for making it a little easier to read, though again, I don't know if there is a formal rule for this. – Neil Nov 22 '17 at 13:00
  • I second @Neil. I think this is more poetic than verbal. – Varun Nair Nov 22 '17 at 13:25
  • I agree. It's a matter of style and voice. (Perhaps think about using "nor too short, rather than "or'.) – Livrecache Nov 22 '17 at 13:29
  • @Livrecache Like this? her hair wasn't too long nor too short, her face not too round nor too angular, her body not too thin nor too thick. What's the difference? – alex Nov 22 '17 at 13:41
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    If I were using nor, I'd pair it with neither, like this: "Her hair was neither too long nor too short, her face neither too round nor too angular, her body neither too thin nor too thick." This style comes across as particularly literary. – Canadian Yankee Nov 22 '17 at 19:00

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