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I have two sentence:

  1. Diurnal fluctuation of temperature exists at the downstream location in River A.
  2. Diurnal fluctuations of temperature exists at a location in River B.

I combine them into one sentence:

  1. Diurnal fluctuation of temperature exist at the downstream location in River A as well as in River B.

Howerver, I was wondering if "sentence 3" are ambiguity? That is, in the original "sentence 2", the location is not designated (maybe it is in downstream, upstream, etc). But in "sentence 3", does it mean that the station is "in downstream of River B"?

If it is, what should I do not to misdirect the location?

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Yes, this type of construction can be ambiguous. One often relocates the troublesome phrase to the end of the sentence to eliminate any ambiguity: "Diurnal fluctuations of temperature exist in River B and at the downstream location in River A."

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