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I have a question related to grammar. What's the negative of the sentence "He is going to the market" without changing the meaning?

I think it should be:

It is not that he is not going to the market.

Am I right? Actually there is an example in my textbook which says make the sentence "He is going to the market" without changing the meaning.

  • You are correct, but the negative-of-a-negative structure is likely confusing in any language, and I would not recommend using it. – Andrew Nov 25 '17 at 17:36
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The concept of:

It is not that he is not going to the market.

is incomplete. This needs to be followed by some explanation. For example:

It is not that he is not going to the market. He just hasn't had lunch yet.

This is different from the simple statement "He is going to the market". Equal to that would be:

He is not not going to the market.

but this is not negative but rather double-negative.

The bottom line is making a statement actually negative changes the meaning.

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