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In Collins dictionary website, I found an example as follows,

"A report yesterday that said British unemployment would continue to rise."

My question is, Why it is not, "A report yesterday said that British unemployment would continue to rise."

Is the first example with "that said" some kind of writer style? Or it should be the right grammatical way to say that.

Or both sentences are grammatical and usable?

Thanks in advance.

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Confusion may arise because both "that said" and "said that" are common phrases; however, their meaning is very different here.

The first example, "A report yesterday that said British unemployment would continue to rise." is not a complete sentence but a phrase describing the report. That is, both "yesterday" and "that said British unemployment would continue to rise" modify "report"; there is no verb to follow. Other examples of restrictive relative clauses following a noun are

A report that addresses recent events

A report that lacks vital information

A report that looks like a five-year-old made it

Your rewording ""A report yesterday said that British unemployment would continue to rise." instead forms a complete sentence, as in the following:

A report said that the bridge is unstable.

A report noted that crime is decreasing.

A report argued that the problem is insignificant.

Here, "that" acts as a conjunction introducing the object of the verb.

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  • Thanks for the answer,. But it is little difficult to understand your answer. Can you give me some example or explain in detail.?
    – Raj 33
    Commented Nov 25, 2017 at 19:11
  • How about now? Please let me know if anything is unclear. Commented Nov 25, 2017 at 19:28
  • The sentence would be complete if it read: A report yesterday (that said British unemployment would continue to rise) has been rejected by the government. Commented Nov 25, 2017 at 23:33
  • @Chemomechanics, thanks for the clear answer with examples.
    – Raj 33
    Commented Nov 26, 2017 at 4:24
  • @Ronald Sole , In my example, the sentence has a full stop and so I thought the topic is over. But your example clearly shows that's the sentence is still continuing "has been rejected by the government". Do you think that the example shown in the website is wrong with having a full stop at end of the sentence?
    – Raj 33
    Commented Nov 26, 2017 at 4:35

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