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I always have issues with using which clauses. I appreciate if someone could let me know if the which clause in the sentence below is correct.

Something brings about unprecedented challenges to B which can be greatly alleviated by C.

The original sentences were:

1) Something brings about unprecedented challenges to B.
2) These challenges can be greatly alleviated by C.

1

The "relative clause" is free to modify the previous noun, the 'noun to noun' noun phrase or even the whole previous phrase.

Example:

  • The bus for Zadar, which is usually very punctual, has been late. - Here the non-defining relative clause refers to "The bus (for Zadar)" and not to "Zadar" as you can make from the context.

In most cases the reader is to determine what is being modified from the meaning of the sentence (from the context). So, yes, the relative clause is correct in your example, but it could be that it's a non-defining relative clause whereupon you should place a comma before it.

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