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What is this thing called ? Is it just a ‘Glass Half-wall’ or does it have another name? And what if it was outdoors ? enter image description here

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    Some people see the glass half empty, some see it half full, some see the glass half wall. Seriously, though, I guess the main point of this wall is to keep people from walking off of the edge of the upper split level? Dec 3 '17 at 0:29
  • A glass pony wall.
    – bishop
    Dec 3 '17 at 21:10
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    That moment when you realise this question wasn't about some bizarre variation on "glass half full"
    – Clonkex
    Dec 3 '17 at 22:43
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I would call it a half-height glass separation or partition.

The pinterest image you showed was found using those keywords

Interestingly enough so was Pony wall and Half wall

A pony wall is a short wall. In different circumstances, it may refer to: a half wall that only extends partway from floor to ceiling, without supporting anything. a stem wall, a concrete wall that extends from the foundation slab to the cripple wall or floor joists.Wikipedia

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  • The very meaning of half-wall is that it looks like a wall. It is solid, may be even decorated the same way as walls. If it is glass, or fine woodwork, or whatever, it is not a wall. Dec 3 '17 at 2:42
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    I disagree. Glass walls are walls. I even had a half wall made of glass bricks
    – mplungjan
    Dec 3 '17 at 5:19
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I've seen the following two, though they may be technically wrong:

  • Glass Banister
  • Glass Balustrade

(British English)

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    As an Australian, balustrade was my first thought too, the same as you have on a balcony. Dec 3 '17 at 2:07
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    I don’t think either one of those is technically wrong.
    – J.R.
    Dec 3 '17 at 12:53
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    In my mind, a bannister is the part of the stars. Balustrade is a long expanse of protection from falling off a balcony or inner walkway
    – mplungjan
    Dec 3 '17 at 18:01
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I would call it a "wood-framed glass railing". If it were outdoors, I might call it a "wood-framed glass fence".

If the top edge of the railing/fence were glass (instead of wood), I would just call it a "glass railing".

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    But the railing is wood! Dec 2 '17 at 20:57
  • Jasper, whether exterior or interior the name is always "railing". a glass wall or a glass fence is a very different thing. Also, notice that no matter whether it is entirely made of glass or partially it will still be a glass railing and because it has more than one component - it is a system. compare a standalone railing with a railing system composed of several railings. Btw, the top edge is probably the handrail as far as I know. Dec 3 '17 at 17:15
  • A railing is normally only on the side of the stairs.
    – mplungjan
    Dec 3 '17 at 17:59
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    @mplungjan No, you are wrong. A railing can be wherever it needs to be. A balcony can have a railing, a border of a pool can have a railing. Dec 3 '17 at 18:08
  • @SovereignSun Yes, but do we include the part underneath, in this case the glass part, in the word "railing"?
    – Mr Lister
    Dec 3 '17 at 18:18
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Actually, this is simply a part of the glass railing system. Basically, a glass guardrail. You can often see these in malls and supermarkets, and in office buildings.

My personal thoughts: People may mistakenly think it's a half wall or a partition wall but it's not. It doesn't split, separate or divide the room. It doesn't enclose an area within a larger area. Notice that it isn't standalone unlike half walls or partition walls, it is a combination of two guardrails creating a railing system.

What you see here is just a kind of a glass railing system with the handrail made of wood and with rather wide glass panels. The guardrail on the staircase is also a part of the glass railing system. You can google for "interior glass railing systems" and you'll find a lot of examples.

Here are a few examples of such interior glass railing systems:

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

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  • I agree that this is a better name for what’s in the picture. I’m not sure I’d go so far as to say that glass half-wall would be a “mistake”.
    – J.R.
    Dec 3 '17 at 12:49
  • @J.R. Thank you for your comment. I've edited so that people understand that that paragraph is my personal thought. Dec 3 '17 at 17:10

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