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I wrote this sentence:

Yes, radio, the one we always think something of past.

I think there is some problem with this sentence. I wrote it as a standalone sentence. After some rereading I thought to insert a "is" between "think" and "something", but then avoided it. Not quite right, I thought. Then think a "about" or "of" or an"as" after "think" will do the work. Please comment and help here.

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  • Can you explain what your sentence is supposed to communicate? (Although it's still unidiomatic, it becomes understandable if you insert is. But since I'm not sure what your intended meaning is, I can't tell you for sure what to change.)
    – user230
    Dec 26 '13 at 12:35
  • I want to mean "radio is something of past. I mean it's a old stuff, and that is what we think." Again rethinking, I think the sentence is ok as "think" can be used as transitive as well. Dec 26 '13 at 12:46
  • Yes, radio, the one we always think of as in the past. Or: Yes, radio, the one we always think is of the past. Or, to avoid a more awkward wording: Yes, radio, the one we always regard with nostalgia.
    – J.R.
    Dec 26 '13 at 12:54
  • @Man_From_India It sounds to me as if you're talking about one specific radio, as something old. But, your comment makes me think that you probably wanted to say about all radios in general. I'm not sure which one you intended to say. Dec 26 '13 at 12:56
  • All radios in general. Dec 26 '13 at 13:19
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I think it should be "the radio", matched with a comment above, to form "Yes, the radio, the one we always regard with nostalgia."

I'd use "the radio" as we'd be referring to radios in general.

Or I'd use "Yes, the radio, the one thing that always reminds us of the past." Or "...always makes us think of the past."

I'd just pop a comment up there but I don't have the points for that, so I hope this helps.

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If you intend to refer to the radio as obsolete, outdated technology, you would say

Yes, radio, the one we always think of as a thing of the past.

"a thing of the past" = something outmoded; something that is no longer popular; something that no longer happens or that no longer exists.

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Yes, radio, the one we always think something of past.

The verb think needs to have a complement. We always think of something, or about something. Here, the thought is a specific thought, not a general reflection about a topic, so the preposition is of. So: “radio, the one we always think of …”

To introduce the idea that radio belongs to the past, you need to express the relationship between radio and past. The sentence is trying to express that when we think of radio, we think it belongs to the past; the construction you're looking for is:

Yes, radio, the one we always think of as something past.

Radio is compared (“as”) to “something [that is] past”. Alternatively, and a bit more idiomatically, use the idiom “a thing of the past”.

Yes, radio, the one we always think of as a thing of the past.

The phrase “the one” can only be used if radio is a member of a set, and “the one” refers to radio as opposed to members of that set.

He is a radio presenter, a TV anchor and a blogger. His favorite medium is the radio. Yes, radio, the one we always think of as something past.

As a standalone sentence, the sentence with “the one” sounds strange. If you aren't explicitly opposing radio to other media, the determinate article is not appropriate.

He likes to listen to the radio. Yes, radio, which we always think of as a thing of the past.
He likes to listen to the radio. Yes, radio, that which we always think of as a thing of the past.

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