2
  1. It's not as good a restaurant as it used to be.
  2. It's not as a good restaurant as it used to be.

Which sentence is correct?

  • Both "It's not as good a restaurant as it used to be." and "It's not a restaurant as good as it used to be." are correct to me. "The restaurant is not as good as it used to be" might be more natural? – dan Dec 4 '17 at 7:40
  • @Dan Unfortunately, the second sentence is incorrect in respect to grammar. – SovereignSun Dec 4 '17 at 7:42
  • @SovereignSun, really? I saw the sentence like "She is a cook as good as her mother" – dan Dec 4 '17 at 7:44
  • @Dan I guess it was a non-native speaker who wrote it or an uneducated native speaker. Or simply an uneducated person. – SovereignSun Dec 4 '17 at 7:49
  • @SovereignSun, I think it's ok if you consider "It's not a restaurant (that is) as good as it used to be." , "She is a cook (who is) as good as her mother." – dan Dec 4 '17 at 8:20
2

The first sentence is correct (Learning English BBC World Service):

  • It's not as good a restaurant as it used to be.
  • I hope you will agree that I am as imaginative a cook as my wife (is)!

Note from the above example that if there is an adjective and a noun after the first as, a / an must go between them.

Also noted here (English Grammar):

  • He is as good a cook as his wife is! (NOT He is as a good cook as his wife is.)

When we use adjective + noun after the first as, the article should go before the noun.

| improve this answer | |
  • I agree, Alexander. "It's not as good a restaurant as it used to be" is definitely the only correct choice. – Nick Dec 4 '17 at 7:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.