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Does “Running” in this sentence mean “ongoing activity” or “initiating an activity” Or other meanings?

1) The surprise attack sent the enemy (moved the enemy quickly) so that it made them start running (“on going activity” or “initiating activity”).

Can I believe that the following examples mean same as (1)?

  • After his four years as governor, the voters sent him packing.
  • Her screams brought the neighbors running.
  • The explosion sent glass flying everywhere.
  • When Jesus sent the disciples out fishing to teach them about obedience,

Otherwise Does “Running” in this sentence mean simply “and they ran” or “so that they ran”?

2) The surprise attack sent the enemy (moved the enemy quickly) and they ran / or so that they ran.

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The idiom to send someone running - to scare off - is derived from the other idiom

run for the hills: To flee hastily; to clear out or depart quickly. To move to higher ground, as in preparation for or in response to a natural disaster. There are bound to be tidal waves after an earthquake like that

When you send them running, you are making them leave quickly because you are seen as a threat.

From your list, only the first one After his four years as governor, the voters sent him packing. comes close in meaning

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