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He won't go today to school because he has an appointment.

or

He won't go to school today because he has an appointment.

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    Your sentences have two differences: the position of the time adjunct today and the choice between the negative auxiliaries doesn't and won't. Which would you like to ask about specifically?
    – user230
    Dec 7, 2017 at 17:33
  • the first one. the position of the time
    – user60016
    Dec 7, 2017 at 17:39
  • You could use be in school in place of go to school: He won't be in school today because he has an appointment. (I'm not saying go to is wrong, but I think I'd be more inclined to use be in.)
    – J.R.
    Dec 7, 2017 at 18:30
  • @J.R.: that's a British/American thing. I'd be more likely to say "go to school" than "be at school", and I would never say "be in school".
    – Colin Fine
    Dec 7, 2017 at 19:38
  • @ColinFine: I'm with J.R on this one: "won't go to school" sounds like he is refusing to go. "won't be in school" or "won't be going to school" sound like a statement of fact that he will not be present.
    – JavaLatte
    Apr 23, 2018 at 3:54

3 Answers 3

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These are the ways you could place "today" in this sentence:

Today the child isn't going to school, because he has an appointment.

The child isn't going to school today, because he has an appointment.

The child isn't going to school, because he has an appointment today.

and awkwardly (but grammatically):

The child isn't going today to school, because he has an appointment.

As for the difference between doesn't and won't go to school, that should be asked as a separate question.

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    The last one jars in my ears... - it is a weird version of the second
    – mplungjan
    Dec 7, 2017 at 18:30
  • @mplungjan Yes, I agree, but as far as I know it's grammatical. I've heard similar expressions from time to time.
    – Andrew
    Dec 7, 2017 at 22:58
  • Using "the child" sounds really odd to me.
    – Catija
    Dec 8, 2017 at 0:08
  • @Catija Oh, well that's just my general indifference towards children :D
    – Andrew
    Dec 8, 2017 at 0:09
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As @snailplane pointed out there are two differences here, where you placed "today" in the sentence, and the verb "doesn't" or "won't".

"To go to" is a verb phrase and separating it would be incorrect, so the second sentence is right.

The difference in verb choice is less about grammar than meaning, but the second sentence's "won't" is the right choice there as well. The reason is that "doesn't" means that it is a habit, he never goes to school. You could say something like the following sentence:

He doesn't go to school because he is taught by his parents.

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    I don't understand why that is an excuse given to a school. In UK teaching by parents instead of school is a formal process required by law. Using that excuse here is no better than "we are on holiday". Dec 7, 2017 at 18:53
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Your first sentence is not good. In the second sentence the use of "won't go" suggests the child is being wilful and the reason given is an excuse.

I suggest a better version of "will not go" is

My child will not be at school today because he has an appointment.

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