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What does the phrase in bold mean?

When Mr. Hampton looked into his rearview mirror he saw his daughter sending a text message on her cellphone. “Katie, you shouldn’t be texting all the time,” Mr. Hampton recalled telling her. “Your friends are there. It’s rude.” Katie rolled her eyes again. “But, Dad, we’re texting each other,” she replied. “I don’t want you to hear what I’m saying.” Mr. Hampton turned his attention back to the freeway. It’s a common scene these days, one playing out in cars, kitchens and bedrooms across the country.

Source: The New York Times

  • ... and pronoun one refers back to scene. He bought a long ladder, one tall enough to reach up to the roof. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 8 '17 at 15:17
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"Playing out" is a phrasal verb meaning "happening". See https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/play-out

The scene (of kids texting) is playing out (i.e. "happening") all over the place.

It’s a common scene these days, one THAT IS playing out (i.e. "happening") in cars, kitchens and bedrooms across the country.

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