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While talking to my daughter yesterday, I challenged her that she cannot get ready in 10 minutes. We were, actually, going out. She's keen in learning English, and she surprises me with either her answers or her questions!

Now the general case:

We emphasize our confidence by putting do (verb) as in...

You don't see that ~ Ah, I do see!
You don't care ~ I do care!

But, the conversation went like:

Rhyme, leave it! You cannot get ready in 10 minutes
Dad, I do can!

Now, grammatically, it could be plain wrong. I know this. But, my question is by any chance, even in an informal language ...is it correct?

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    "I sure can" sounds meaningful. – CinCout Dec 15 '17 at 7:11
  • @CinCout aww... I surely can! – Maulik V Dec 15 '17 at 8:20
  • Am I wrong in using sure? AFAIK, it is just an informal way while surely is formal. – CinCout Dec 15 '17 at 8:25
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    @CinCount: you're right - surely is formally correct but sure is in common colloquial use. – smatterer Dec 15 '17 at 8:43
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"I can do." is a common enough expression or even just "Can do."

As for "I do can." -- Sorry, no can do. That doesn't work at any degree of informality.

| improve this answer | |
  • Indeed, I can't think of any occasion where "do" can come before a modal (we can't say "do shall", *"do will", *"do may", *"do must", *"do might") even in the most informal language (although "did ought" is acceptable as a replacement for "ought not", and "did use(d) to" always works informally, but those are semi-modals). Some dialects permit modal-stacking, e.g. "might should", but I've never seen "do can" (though "do" is non-modal anyway), but even if it exists in some dialect, it would definitely be nonstandard. – rjpond Dec 15 '17 at 9:51
  • As a native US English speaker, I've never heard anyone say "I can do", and it sounds very weird to me. "Can do", yes, but not "I can do." Can you provide any source or reference for it? – stangdon Dec 15 '17 at 14:53
  • "I can do" is perfectly normal in BrE (although it's no more emphatic than "I can", so it isn't comparable to the non-existent "I do can" form). See separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.co.uk/2007/09/… – rjpond Dec 15 '17 at 18:23

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