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I was translating a technical text and came across the following part in bold format. I have two questions regarding this:

Randomized trials have demonstrated that early ERCP (within 24 or 48 hours of admission) reduces complications, but not mortality, in patients with predicted severe gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis. The benefits of this invasive modality (release of the presumed impacted stone) may be offset, however, but the risks of the procedure, which include an increase in the severity of pancreatitis.

Q1: Is offset here a verb or noun? Does it mean "to neutralize some potential benefits"?

Q2: How should I get "however, but the risks of the procedure". It doesn't make any sense to me. I haven't seen any sentences like this before.

  • 1
    The "but" doesn't sound right. Are you sure that's the correct quote? As written the last sentence is incomplete. – Andrew Dec 16 '17 at 3:28
  • @Andrew Yes I am 100 precent sure because I wrote it from the book in front of me. If you want I can send you a photo. – Cardinal Dec 17 '17 at 0:45
  • Ok then. In that case there's a misprint somewhere because the sentence is not grammatical. If you change "but" to "by" does the sentence make sense to you? – Andrew Dec 17 '17 at 0:48
  • @Andrew Yes, thanks now It's clear to me. However I am not sure if "offset " is a noun or the past participle. I would say it's the past participle. – Cardinal Dec 17 '17 at 0:49
  • It's the main verb of this sentence. "The benefits (of Y) may be offset by X" See to offset (v) – Andrew Dec 17 '17 at 4:52
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This sentence is not grammatically correct. Are you sure you copied it correctly? I think it should be this instead:

The benefits of this invasive modality (release of the presumed impacted stone) may be offset, however, by the risks of the procedure, which include an increase in the severity of pancreatitis.

May is a modal auxiliary verb (see here: http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/auxiliary_verbs.htm). Be offset is the main verb (passive form of to offset).

The sentence is saying that the benefits might be cancelled out by the risks.

  • Hello and thanks for the answer. I just wrote exactly the words one by one from the hard copy. If you want I can send you the photo of the book. – Cardinal Dec 17 '17 at 0:44

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