3

It's mine

Which is simple and I can use it without any doubt anywhere. However, the below examples with "his" & "hers" are not that simple to me to use in my daily usage. I want to know how a native speaker would say this.

It's hers

It's his

Or is it mandatory to use the object name whenever we use "his", "her",....

It's her pen

It's his pen

Question update to make it more clear:

I'm not asking about difference or which one is correct. I'm just asking, as a native speaker would you say "It's his" in your daily conversation. Because, for a non native speaker like me, "It's his" without using object name doesn't sound good whenever I say it.

  • 1
    Maybe I don't understand, because I am having trouble understanding how these are different to you. As long as the object you are referring to with "it" is clear, you can indicate its ownership with any of "it's mine," "it's hers," or "it's his." They are all the same. "Whose pen is this?" can be answered with any of them. – joiedevivre Dec 16 '17 at 8:24
  • I'm not asking about difference or which one is correct. I'm just asking, as a native speaker would you say "its his" in your daily conversation. Because, for a non native speaker like me, "Its his" without using object name doesn't sound good whenever I say it. – Raj 33 Dec 16 '17 at 8:37
  • 1
    Yes, I would say "it's mine," "it's hers", or "it's his" with the same regularity. To me, the grammatical structure is exactly the same, they all sound good, and none of them needs an object. Does that help? – joiedevivre Dec 16 '17 at 8:46
  • 1
    @joiedevivre -- Your comments would make a good answer. – Jasper Dec 16 '17 at 9:05
  • 1
    The things we are talking about don't belong to "it." They belong to me, him, or her. "It's" is a contraction, here. It is mine. It is his. It is hers. – joiedevivre Dec 16 '17 at 9:09
1

After our exchange in the comments, I think what may be tripping you up is that "my" and "mine" sound so clearly different, but there's no difference in orthography or phonology between "his" and "his." But these are both perfectly natural to native English speakers:

It's his pen.
It's his.

I'm not surprised if that feels strange to you if your language has different declensions for these cases, though!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.