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I'm looking for the native English word for a particular sensation that one commonly associates with exercise fatigue. Let me give some background information first:

I've been looking to extend my walking distance, so for the last few days, I've been seeing how much I can walk before I need to sit down. At the end of the walk, I get this sensation: my thigh muscles start feeling as if they've been turned to wood, and a specific kind of ache develops the longer the muscle is under the stress of standing/walking. This subsides within seconds of sitting down.

I have gone to the gym before and I know how DOMS(delayed onset muscle soreness) feels like, so I don't think this is DOMS, 'cause it's different and it comes and goes instantly.

Also this doesn't feel like cramps either, since cramps are caused under different circumstances(more sudden, usually caused due to deficiencies, etc).

What could it be?

P.S. For any Marathi speakers out there, I think the most common synonym for this particular sensation is गोळे येणे.

  • BTW, I've searched the net and I've found 'muscle soreness', but for some reason that seems too generic to me. – cst1992 Dec 17 '17 at 5:52
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I don't know if we have a word for that. I think I know the feeling you're referring to. I might just call it "muscle fatigue" or maybe, if I want to be technical, "lactic acid buildup." I think that we might even say that your muscles are "sore," even though this is a different kind of soreness than the kind that sets in a day after exercise.

  • Yes, I think so too. This isn't DOMS; it feels different. – cst1992 Dec 18 '17 at 6:35
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I assume that you are not looking for the correct medical terminology and are seeking "layman's terms" that would be used in everyday speech.

People tend to speak of muscle ache rather than "pain".

They also refer to "stiffness" or "soreness" if they cannot move their muscles as much, or feel pain when they do so.

Unless you can actually give a specific medical name to a condition causing aches and pains, then these are the general terms in use.

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