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I have a problem with connecting each adjacent sentences with each other, what kind of -ing word is this!.. an adjective participle!.. can I replace it with relative pronoun!.. could you please help me with the starting of each sentence!.. I'll appreciate your help

This method starts from the principle that the paraffin and asphaltene particles of the crude oil can be polarized by the effect of electric field, forcing them to aggregate into short chains parallel to the electric field direction, changing the rheological properties of the crude oil, resulting in a decrease in the crude oil viscosity, and thus easily pumped through the pipes.

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These are not participle adjectives. A participle adjective describes a noun

A mouthwatering cake.

That's not what we are looking at in the text you have provided. What you have are verbs. To clarify their use and meaning we can rewrite your text as a series of sentences.

This method starts from the principle that the paraffin and asphaltene particles of the crude oil can be polarized by the effect of electric field. This polarization forces them to aggregate into short chains parallel to the electric field direction. The aggregation into chains changes the rheological properties of the crude oil. The final result of this process is a decrease in the crude oil viscosity. The oil can then be easily pumped through the pipes.

The last clause about the ease of pumping is not parallel and represents a writing error by the original author. Apparently even the author couldn't hold this heinous run-on sentence in his or her brain.

You could rewrite using a relative pronoun if you really want to but my feeling is that doing so makes this even more grievous to read.

This method starts from the principle that the paraffin and asphaltene particles of the crude oil can be polarized by the effect of electric field, which forces them to aggregate into short chains parallel to the electric field direction, which changes the rheological properties of the crude oil, which results in a decrease in the crude oil viscosity. This oil is then easily pumped through the pipes.

The above is probably grammatically correct but it reads terribly.

Note that the same pattern as is in your original text can be seen more easily in a simple example

She fell off her bike, scraping her knee, bleeding all over, and making a big mess.

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This method starts from the principle that the paraffin and asphaltene particles of the crude oil can be polarized by the effect of electric field, forcing them to aggregate into short chains parallel to the electric field direction, changing the rheological properties of the crude oil, resulting in a decrease in the crude oil viscosity, and thus easily pumped through the pipes.

With the exception of the final phrase "and thus easily pumped", which lacks a subject, your sentence is grammatical, but it could be rewritten to avoid those repetitive participles:

This method starts from the principle that the paraffin and asphaltene particles of the crude oil can be polarized by the effect of electric field, which forces them to aggregate into short chains parallel to the electric field direction and changes the rheological properties of the crude oil, resulting in a decrease in the crude oil viscosity, and thus so that it can be easily pumped through the pipes.

P.S. The practice is not ungrammatical, but scientific writing tends to overuse (IMO) nouns as adjectives, so I would suggest:

... parallel to the direction of the electric field

rather than

... parallel to the electric field direction

P.P.S. And you might want to say "more easily pumped".

  • Does "electric field" have a non-count sense here? I would expect to see "the effect of an electric field". – Gary Botnovcan Dec 20 '17 at 17:03
  • Yes, it can have a non-count sense, i.e. not a particular electric field but of electric field generally. "...the effect of electric field on reaction would appear to be negligible" ("Modelling Pressure and Electrokinetic Flow" by J.M. MacInnes, p 62 in Microfluidics: History, Theory and Applications ed William B. J. Zimmerman. New York, 2006) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 20 '17 at 17:53

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