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I know one says "you are" regardless if "you" is used as plural or singular, but what happens if you use it in "you, my friend, (...). Is it changed into "you, my friend, is..." or "you, my friend, are..." Please help.

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    It’s always are. – Dan Bron Dec 21 '17 at 21:29
  • Thank you for the incredibly quick response Dan! Appreciate it, I'm writing a book at this very moment. – A. Kvåle Dec 21 '17 at 21:30
  • You always use plural you. So, you are is correct. – Bob Dec 21 '17 at 21:49
  • It is never your are, however (unless you’re talking about the rather obscure old word are meaning ‘grace’ or the deprecated SI unit that forms the basis of hectare). – Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 21 '17 at 22:07
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As you have said, it is you are regardless whether you is used as singular or plural. In the case given, "you, my friend, (...)" it is still are, as in, "you, my friend, are".

The sentence structure around the insertion of my friend, delineated by commas, should remain the same whether the insertion exists or not. The extra clause, added for emphasis, should not alter the construction of the main clause in which it has been inserted.

cf. The sentence structure around the insertion of my friend should remain the same whether the insertion exists or not. The extra clause should not alter the construction of the main clause in which it has been inserted.

  • The "extra clause" isn't even a clause. It's just a noun phrase used as an address. It's only function is to identify the intended audience of the associated clause. – Gary Botnovcan Dec 22 '17 at 0:42

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