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I have some questions.
Please tell me these sentences are correct or not.

1. I went to school after "eating" the bread
2. I went to school after "I ate" the bread
3. I went to school after "I have(or had?) eaten" the bread

And these change I to you.

1. I left office after "you leaving" office
2. I left office after "you left" office
3. I left office after "you have(or had?) left" office

thanks, I added some more sentences.
If I want to say it in the future , is it correct?

  1. I will leave office after "your leaving" office
  2. I will leave office after "you left" office
  3. I will leave office after "you have left" office
  • Only no. 1 in your future sense is correct because you've left out the verb "leave" after "will" in the other two. Also, no. 3 would have to be "you have left". No. 2 is wrong after "after". – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 6:04
  • If you should be talking about a work office, it must read, "I left the office"; if you should be talking about a political office, it must read, "I left office." – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 6:06
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    So I can use past perfect when I'm describing the future? – Ives Dec 24 '17 at 6:07
  • Oops, I misread that because you had forgotten "leave". In the past, you use the past perfect; in the future, you use the present perfect. No. 2 is thus wrong. It should read this way: "I will leave the office after you have left the office." Thanks for catching that. Sorry I had misread it because of the missing verb. – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 6:09
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    You can also write, "I will leave the office after you leave the office" or "I will leave the office after you have left the office." – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 6:17
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Most of them are correct, but I'll rewrite them and add corrections below:

Group 1

  1. I went to school after eating the bread.

  2. I went to school after I ate the bread.

  3. I went to school after I had eaten the bread.

Group 2

  1. I left office after your leaving office.

  2. I left office after you left office.

  3. I left office after you had left office.

The present perfect shouldn't be used in the above examples. The past perfect is more formal than then simple past. In Group 2, No. 1, you would have to use a gerund; therefore, it should be preceded by a possessive adjective ("your").

I hope this might have helped you out. Take care and good luck.

P.S I have left out the article "the" that should precede "office" because I had assumed the question was talking about a political office. I have since been told that the questioner meant "work office"; therefore, it should have an article before the noun "office".

| improve this answer | |
  • The word "office" also needs an article here, but the repetition in the second set can be avoided "I left the office after you." – James K Dec 24 '17 at 5:40
  • It depends. If he should mean "office" in the political sense, no it's fine without an article. Should he be talking about his own office or the work office, then yes, it should have an article. I believe he's talking about a political office; therefore, I do not think it needs a definite article. – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 5:49
  • thank you, if I need to add article, I should add it to both office or only the first one? – Ives Dec 24 '17 at 5:56
  • Well, what are you talking about? Are you talking about a political office or an office such as a work office? If it should be a political office, you don't add an article; should it be an office in general such as your office at work, then you add an article. I assumed you were talking about a political office, so I did not add an article above. – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 5:59
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    Yeah, and in this sense, it changed the meaning. By saying, "I left office" instead of "I left the office", I assumed you were talking about a political office such as a senator or even the office of the President of the United States, but you meant the work office, so it must have an article. – Nick Dec 24 '17 at 6:12

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