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I have a small room and house.
I have a small room and a small house.
I have a small room and, I have a small house.

I tried to bring the groceries and help her.
I tried to bring the groceries and to help her.
I tried to bring the groceries and, I tried to help her.

I did this to make him and his friend to shoo away from here.
I did this to make him and make his friend to shoo away from here.
I did this to make him and to make his friend to shoo away from here.
I did this to make him and, I did this to make his friend to shoo away from here.

I don't want to make him angry and fight with him.
I don't want to make him angry and don't want to fight with him.
I don't want to make him angry and, I don't want to fight with him.

I want to eat apples and oranges.
I want to eat apples and eat oranges.
I want to eat apples and to eat oranges.
I want to eat apples and want to eat oranges.
I want to eat apples and, I want to eat oranges.

I eat healthy vegetables and fruits.
I eat healthy vegetables and healthy fruits.
I eat healthy vegetables and eat healthy fruits.
I eat healthy vegetables and, I eat healthy fruits.

To put forward my question, I have put up a lot of examples. I just want to know what necessitates the need of repeating the parts of speech after conjunction and. Is the reason grammatical, clarification, emphasis or something else?

Do these sentences differ from one another in any way?

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    As an aside, those examples in which you have repeated the subject ("I") require a comma before the "and"; otherwise, they become "run-on" sentences. There are issues with each of your set of examples, but I don't have time to address them at the moment. Perhaps someone else can provide you with a good answer. – Mark Hubbard Dec 24 '17 at 17:54
  • @MarkHubbard Please do suggest the edits. – Anubhav Singh Dec 24 '17 at 17:55
  • @MarkHubbard I am working on adding oxford comma – Anubhav Singh Dec 24 '17 at 17:55
  • It's done. Oxford comma has been added. – Anubhav Singh Dec 24 '17 at 17:57
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    "I have a small room in a small house." "I brought the groceries in and tried to help her." "I shooed away him and his friend." "I don't want to make him angry and wind up fighting with him." "I want to eat apples and oranges." (Fine as is.) "I eat healthy fruits and vegetables." (Slightly more idiomatic.) – Mark Hubbard Dec 24 '17 at 18:05
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I will just focus on one set of examples:

I want to eat apples and oranges.

This is the most natural and common way to say this. You want to eat apples and oranges but are not particular about which one or how much of each you get.

I want to eat apples and eat oranges.

You would not normally write this. It puts an emphasis on eating that is only needed if you are doing something other than eating one of the items in the list.

I want to eat apples and to eat oranges.

Similar to the above. You would only use it if you were also listing something that will not be eaten.

I want to eat apples and want to eat oranges.

This puts an emphasis on wanting. You would not normally write this unless you were including something that you do not want to eat. Like if you said "I want to eat apples, hate to eat Brussel sprouts, and love to eat oranges." Even then, repeating the exact same verb very would be very strange (you can see I changed it for my example).

I want to eat apples, and I want to eat oranges.

This puts emphasis on the two parts--I guess the emphasis is on the "and." You want to eat apples and you equally want to eat oranges. You would use this, for example, if someone was trying to make you choose between apples and oranges and you want to emphasize that you want them both equally.

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